What's New on WEbook

Haunted house It's Halloween, and WEbook is celebrating by unveiling a few very spooky site improvements!
Edit
Beware!  Undead Project Leaders can now close their projects for submissions.  This means that if a group of vampires is writing a collection of stories set in a crypt, their vampire Project Leader can decide when to stop accepting terrifying new stories.  How can such a hair-raising feat be accomplished?  It's easy: from the my TOOLS menu within a project, click "Edit Project Settings."  At the bottom, you'll see the option to close your project for submissions.  You can always re-open the project later if you decide you want more submissions.  (Note:  Regular, mortal Project Leaders can also close their projects.)


Updates If Project Updates on your personal homepage make you scream with fright, you're in for a treat!  Updates now appear in digest form, so you can see what's happening in your projects at a glance.  Still too scary?  No worries -- navigate to My Projects through the My WEbook tab, and you'll be able to pick and choose which projects you want to receive updates for.


In other news, the WEbook voting cycle is heating up!  Starting November 4, WEbookers will read and vote on over 500 books.  Your favorites could become the next published WEbooks!  To get a head start on the voting process, start reading today.  Voting is open from November 4 to November 18.  WEbookers can give projects the thumbs up (publish!), thumbs down (don't think so), and thumbs "nuetral" (don't know).  You can cast your vote for as many projects as you like, but only one vote per project.



WTF? It’s WEbooker of the WEek!

WoW_button_1
I have a lot of favorite projects on WEbook, and every once
in a while I realize that several of those projects are led by the very same
WEbooker.  Today is one of those
onces.  Our newest WEbooker of the WEek, MJ_Heiser, is the Project
Leader of Daily WTF? and More Daily WTF?, interactive
blogging projects that offer daily doses of “incredulity, silly observation,
and irreverent citizenship on Spaceship Earth.” 
She has also led seven different versions of the Triangle
Challenge
, where writers contribute short stories that must incorporate
a pre-defined location, event, and item—the current challenge includes a pub, a
general election, and lipstick. 



But wait!  There’s
more!



 MJ_Heiser is also writing a
novel, Corona, which more than one
WEbooker has nominated for WEbook Featured Project status.  Corona tells the story of
three thirty-something nobodies who are unexpectedly thrust into a brave new
world, where they’re “forced to find out what they're really made of,
confronting their own cowardice, malice, and complacency.”



But wait!  There’s even more!



MJ_Heiser
is the author of the romance novel Turn the Page, about
a couple of garage band rockers whose sudden fame makes them long for home and
the comfort of their childhood friends.



So, who is this prolific, talented WEbook writer? 



MJ_Heiser
MJ_Heiser
started reading at the age of three, “encouraged every step of the way by a
father with a profound love of the written word.”  After winning a
bookworm award in grade school for reading the most books during the contest
period, she started dabbling with writing stories at the age of eight.  She’s
tried her hand at writing different genres, from chick lit/romance to short
story horror to screenplays. (“Please don't ask; the screenplays are DREADFUL.”) 
Says MJ_Heiser: “Reading
and writing are the ultimate form of escapism for me, and more rewarding every
day -- especially since stumbling across WEbook!”



Dying to know more? 
As always, WEbook asks the tough questions:



Q:  What are the three most important ingredients for a perfect day? 



A:  I live in Austin,
Texas; I wrote a WTF? regarding how
I really feel about the weather here
.  It is therefore essential that
the perfect day include high temperatures in the 70s and the opportunity for
rain.  (My poor desiccated grass!) 
Once that's a go, ingredient two is a drive around town to appreciate the
weather and the place I call home.  Finally, give me copious opportunity to
indulge my WEbook addiction (writing, reviewing, and general mayhem with my
friends), and success!  Days don't get any better!



Q:  What is your greatest writing
weakness?




A: My story beginnings are as weak as cheap beer.  I struggle through them
until I hit my stride (usually by the fifth chapter), then go back and try to
address the deficiencies.  WEbook is such a godsend for me in that regard;
I have friends here who are unflinchingly honest in their feedback, and once I
got past my ego, I learned enough to feel much more confident in beginning new
projects.



Q:  What's the last really great
book you read?




A:  Based on a recommendation by jamesmcshane, I read A Thousand Splendid Suns, by Khaled
Hosseini.  The prose was lyrically beautiful, even through the more
harrowing scenes, and the entire journey made me appreciate all of the
liberties I'm afforded.  Higher fuel prices have nothing on having your
home destroyed by militant extremists.



Q:  If you could send a secret
message to anyone in the world, what would you say? 




A:  Boy, this blows the secret right out
of the water, doesn't it?  I think I'd want to send a message to a random
politician currently running for office, threatening to expose him if he
doesn't cough up support for our love child.  Just a little chaos in an
effort to make things more interesting; boredom is for chumps.



Q:  What piece of WEbook writing
are you most proud of?




A:  I'm most proud of Corona, but I'm not sure I
deserve to be.  I've already had to explain several times that the book
has written itself;  I just played hall monitor, ensuring all the pieces
made it back to class at the same time.  I will say, however, that Corona has accomplished
everything I wanted to accomplish for a true freshman effort, bringing together
my love of religious symbolism, allegory, fantasy, and the struggle of Good vs.
Evil in the creative process.



Q:  What's your favorite WEbook
project NOT started by you?



A:  I can only name one? 
Really?  There is so much good work on this website that my visits to my
branch library have taken a nosedive.  We Should Meet by ArtemisX5 is exceptional; the
story is told completely via dialogue (it originated with the Pure Dialogue
project, led by hitogoroshi),
and after a while you forget to miss the exposition.  The
Dark Crusade of Robinson Stone
by jamesmcshane is up and
running as well, and every chapter gives me just enough to keep me fascinated
and rooting for this Irish anti-hero.  Wee Books, led by cindi_greene, is a
serialized story format, a multi-writer version of a format revitalized by
Stephen King's Green Mile.  And
one can never go wrong with anything written by former WoWs GranisGrazin
and RikScott.



WEbooker
of the WEek



Do you have
a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign
up for WEbook today
and start reading, writing, and feedbacking!



-- Melissa







Creative Writing Advice # 13: Surprise! It’s your Character!

Writingsecrets_c By FirstYearGrad


The better we know someone, the more they surprise us with their inconsistencies.

I once worked with a woman who color-coded her desk drawers. She sorted her pens and pencils into three separate holders, depending on the duty they were to perform, and never thought to put a plastic coated paper clip into the same pot as the shiny silver wires.

One day I agreed to pick her up for work. When I got to her house, I was shocked to see that her kitchen table was covered with last night’s dishes, and her sink was full of even older dishes. A great orange tabby cat walked up and down the counter, carefully picking its way around newspapers and old mail. The floor may have been clean, but it was hard to see it under the pile of dirty laundry.

Now, if I had put this woman into a story before I visited her house, her character would have been flat, one-sided, and uninteresting. As I got to know her better, she surprised me all the time with new sides to her personality.

So, writer, know your character — and you best know them better then that person you sit next to at work.


Desperately Seeking FirstYearGrad


Are you the author of this clever writing tip?  If so, please visit my profile and send me a message so I can include a short bio with your entry!


WEbook Writing Secrets


Got a secret I don’t know about? Share it with the world in WEbook Writing Secrets. To submit a secret, email me or visit my profile and send me a message with the subject line: Writing Secrets. The best secrets will be published here and in the WEbook Toolbox. Authors will be credited with a byline and a bio.


Start Writing Now


Put your secrets to work – sign up for WEbook today.


-- Melissa



WEbooker of the WEek Solves the Financial Crisis

Wow_button_1
You may know this WEek’s WEbooker, GranisGrazin, as the
author of the guest blog post “Top Ten
Things to Love about WEbook.”
Or,
you might know her from one of the 18 WEbook projects she leads or from the over 100 projects she has participated
in. You might even know her as Millie Gail
Grundy, B.L.O.B.
, the frumpy middle aged woman on the run from her
previously infuriating life.  A little
rough math (very rough) suggests that GranisGrazin is
contributing to WEbook at the rate of 2000-3000 words per day – not counting
feedback. Her writing ranges from whimsical
to inspirational to hilarious to devotional.



In fact, GranisGrazin
is such an extraordinary WEbooker, I almost forgot to name her WEbooker of the
WEek – until fellow
WoW RikScott
sent me a message telling me to wise up.



To help myself out with the wising-up process, I asked GranisGrazin to tell me
about herself.



Granisgrazin
GranisGrazin
grew up a blanketed (“not just overly insulated”) only child, and went on to
have “the largest family possible,” including five children of her own. She says she couldn’t decide what she wanted
to be when she grew up, so she’s done everything from binding tax bills to
running a campground. She has degrees in
library science, art education, and counseling. She spent 28 years in public education before retiring. On top of all this, GranisGrazin has an
impressive publication history, including 13 educational books for kids. (Read all about it here.)



GranisGrazin is a
cancer survivor, and she credits this experience with forming her mellow
temperament. According to her son, ever
since she had cancer, she sure is “a lot nicer!” GranisGrazin  says she simply doesn’t have time to lose her
temper or hold grudges – she’s having way too much fun living.



WEbookers as remarkable as GranisGrazin don’t come
along every day – so, of course, I took advantage of the situation to ask her
the one question that seems to be on everyone’s mind these days:



What is the solution
to the economic crisis in the U.S.?



Says GranisGrazin:



“I think the current crisis cannot rest on any one group's
shoulders, and the blame and answers are found from the top of the ladder to
the very bottom of the food chain.  I honestly believe this was due in
this country, and we are all going to have to go back and seize the ideas of a
couple of generations before us in terms of how we live and what we
expect.  I think it is time for an old fashioned outlook as far as making
do, abandoning the idea of living on credit and having to keep up with every
latest trend the media wants to tempt us with.



Wise words from a wise WEbooker.



WEbooker
of the WEek




Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, and feedbacking.



-- Melissa





Get Published: It's Voting Season at WEbook!

Vote
Why should the U.S. Presidential candidates get to have all the fun?  Here at WEbook, you can get in the running, too -- to become the next hot published author!



WEbook is now accepting submissions of complete, book-length manuscripts for publication.*  Beginning November 4, WEbook users will go to the polls, casting their votes for the projects that will become WEbook's next published books. 



How can I get my writing published at WEbook?



Projectstartbutton
First, you have to put your book on WEbook.  If you're already there, congratulations!  If not, register for WEbook and click "Get Started Now," at the top right of most pages, to start your WEbook project. 



Or, you can contribute writing to one of the many multi-author projects in progress.  If you go this route, the person who started the project (known as the "Project Leader") gets to decide when to submit it for publication. 



Submit
Remember:  WEbook can only consider completed books for publication.  If you only have one story or poem, or your book isn't finished yet, keep writing!  You can submit your work to a future voting cycle once you're done.  WEbook runs voting cycles every 3-4 months to choose which books to publish.



If you have a complete book on WEbook, submit it for voting and publication by clicking "Submit Your Book" under the my TOOLS menu, in the upper left of your project.



How does voting work?



Writers can submit their books for voting and publication from October 21 through November 3.  Voting starts on November 4.  WEbook users read submitted projects, and give them the thumbs up (publish it!), thumb's down (don't think so), or thumbs neutral (don't know).  Voting ends November 18. 



Once voting is complete, WEbook carefully reviews the books that made it into the top 10%, and selects its next published books from this pool.  Selected authors will be offered a publishing contract, including a 50/50 share of profits from book sales.  All selected books will receive professional editing, proofreading, and design services, and published WEbooks will be available through the website and on amazon.com.



I have more questions about writing and publishing on WEbook!



Great!  Check out our FAQ and Project Leader Guide for all the tips and pointers you could ever need.  If you need more, write to info <at> webook <dot> com.

Get in the running



Sign up for WEbook today to start writing and voting!



-- Melissa



* "Complete, book-length manuscript" means that it can stand alone between two covers of a book.  There is no minimum word-count, and length will vary depending on the type of book.  A complete children's book may be only a few hundred words long; a novel, collection of short stories or essays, or a narrative non-fiction book will usually be between 50,000 and 100,000 words; and poetry books range from one long narrative poem (like Paradise Lost -- it's technically only one poem, but it's separated into chapters, and my little paperback edition is over 400 pages long) to collections including anything from around 50 to hundreds of poems.  When in doubt, compare your project to things you see at the bookstore.  Does it compare in length, completeness, and quality?



WEbooker of the WEek Changes the World, One Community at a Time

Wow_button_1
Have you ever heard of Community
Capacity Enhancement through Conversation
?  Neither had I, until I stumbled upon a WEbook
project by this WEek’s
WEbooker
, chaava. So, what is it? According to chaava:



“A community conversation is a group discussion facilitated by a
trained and experienced facilitator, supported by a co-facilitator and a
documenter.  Community conversations are
a versatile tool that may be used in building community capacity for dealing
with issues ranging from development programming to addressing HIV/AIDS, the
needs of orphans and vulnerable children, and reversing gender inequalities.”



In his project,
chaava collects transcripts
from community conversations staged by expert facilitators in Africa. In these transcripts, community members talk
candidly about their experiences with HIV/AIDS and related issues.



The transcripts provide unedited insight into the lives of people
facing the HIV/AIDS crisis in eastern and southern Africa. Participants
in the project’s
community conversations hold widely varying beliefs about everything from the
dangers of modernization to equal rights for women. Visitors to the project
are rewarded with rich food for thought and an opportunity to view a global
health crisis through multiple lenses.



Who is the man who brought Community
Capacity Enhancement through Conversation
to WEbook?



Chaava
Chaava was
born and raised in Zambia. He lived in
London for two years and in South Africa for eight. He now resides in Alexandria, Virginia.  Chaava
is a medical laboratory scientist, and he has been actively writing for thirty
years. He started with a personal
journal, and his first articles were published in Christian Living Today.  According to chaava, “Writing about African culture
is a big thing for me. I am fascinated by how little people know (and how much
they want to know) about African tradition. At the same time I consider myself a student of my own culture.”  Chaava
is married with four children, and he credits his religious faith with helping

him find happiness in a “very simple life.”



Chaava  believes that “people have the capacity within
themselves to make change happen, and to keep hope aflame through dark and
difficult times. The same is true with communities.” He has studied and practiced Community
Capacity Enhancement for ten years, and says that he learned most of what he
knows from his wife: “She is the most
skilled facilitator you will ever meet.”



Chaava  hopes that his WEbook project will grow into
an entire book of community conversations.



WEbooker
of the WEek



Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, feedbacking, and learning about the world around you!



-- Melissa



Write a Love Letter on WEbook!

Lostloveletters
WEbook is for lovers.



Earlier this week, the WEbook blog featured a project for WEbookers everywhere to share their best text messages of love.  Love by TXT is still going strong, and now there's a new featured project for love-struck writers who can't fit their feelings into 160 characters.



Lost Love Letters invites WEbookers to post love letters -- with a twist.  This project collects the ultimate emblems of unrequited love -- letters and poems that were never sent.  Are you a Dante pining for your Beatrice?  Don Quixote looking for Dulcinea?  Charlie Brown longing after the little red headed girl?  Visit Lost Love Letters and pour your heart out.



Featured
WEbook Projects



Know a really great project on
WEbook? Want to spread the word? Send me an email or visit my profile and drop me a
message to nominate it as a Featured
WEbook Project
!



Start Writing Now!



Today’s featured project is open to all longing lovers! To get started, sign up for WEbook today.



-- Melissa



Hot off the Press: WEbook's Latest Improvements

Profile_wizard
WEbook took a giant leap forward today with the implementation of a new, improved profile page for every user.  Profiles now include information about what kind of WEbook projects you're interested in reading and writing.  Users can also choose to be known as writers, editors, feedbackers, readers, researchers, idea people, devil's advocates -- or all of the above!  Visit your profile through the "My WEbook" tab and take advantage of the nifty Profile Wizard to walk you through the set-up.



Av_dog_small
Av_super_small
Sick of the WEbook Blue Man default avatar, but can't find another image that captures your essence?  The Profile Wizard now lets you choose from a gallery of sixteen funky WEbookers.  Personally, I can't decide which I like best -- the doggie or the superhero.



Other WEbook updates include re-vamped top navigation (the "People" tab now includes groups as well as writers and reviewers, and the new "Vote" tab helps you find the latest info on voting and publishing at WEbook) and a few improvements to your WEbook mailbox.



Start Writing Now!



WEbook is home to writers, readers, editors, doggies, and superheros.  To get started, sign up for WEbook today.



-- Melissa




Creative Writing Advice # 12: Read Other Books Carefully

Writingsecrets By Marieke


Many serious novels, especially those that tackle social subjects, come with a reading guide, which supplies questions for book clubs, students, and other committed readers. If you’re writing a novel, why not make up your own reading guide as you go along? Imagine the questions your readers may have about your book’s themes and characters – this will help you find the strengths and weaknesses of your story.


Here are some suggestions for questions to include in your “Writer’s Reading Guide”:

1. How do the first and last scene frame your novel?

2. Why are the main characters friends? And what do they fear from each other?

(After the Reading Guide to The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini )

3.  Discuss the topic of marriage as it is represented in your novel.

4. What are your thoughts on the structure of your novel?

(After the Reading Guide to The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan)

5. What rules, both written and unwritten, do the characters follow in the novel?

6. In what ways do the settings affect their residents?

(After the Reading Guide to The Cider House Rules by John Irving)

You can find more reading guides on readinggroupguides.com.

About the Author


Marieke van Buytene from the Netherlands is freelance writer, editor and creative writing teacher, so fate has decreed that she’ll never get a novel published.  Fortunately, a friend tipped her on WEbook in August 2008, so now at least she can share The Devil’s Virgin, and soon also her comic mystery stories and more.


WEbook Writing Secrets


Got a secret I don’t know about? Share it with the world in WEbook Writing Secrets. To submit a secret, email me or visit my profile and send me a message with the subject line: Writing Secrets. The best secrets will be published here and in the WEbook Toolbox. Authors will be credited with a byline and a bio.


Start Writing Now


Put your secrets to work – sign up for WEbook today.


-- Melissa



WEbook Featured Project: Love by TXT

Text_message_book_cover_2
R U in luv?  Share your best text messages of love in Love by TXT.  If you've ever sent or received words of devotion through your cell phone, submit them to this new WEbook project.  Open to all WEbookers!



Featured
WEbook Projects



Know a really great project on
WEbook? Want to spread the word? Send me an email or visit my profile and drop me a
message to nominate it as a Featured
WEbook Project
!



Start Writing Now!



Today’s featured project is open to all
writers! To get started, sign up for WEbook today.



-- Melissa



WEbook Featured Project: The Devil’s Virgin

Devilsvirgin
The Devil’s Virgin,

a novel by WEbooker marieke,
opens with an attention-grabbing prologue: A young girl, the narrator, sits on the beach two weeks before her
fourteenth birthday. She’s accosted by a
strange man, who turns out to be the devil. The devil offers to make the girl his companion. “The rewards,” he promises, “will be great.”



The book goes on to tell the story of a young girl, the
daughter of a brothel owner in Thailand. When the girl begins seeing visions, local villagers believe that she
has special powers, and they come to her to tell their stories of hardship,
poverty, hunger, abuse, prostitution, and addiction – as well as their dreams
of escape, rescue, hope, and happiness.  The Devil’s Virgin
weaves these stories together into a rich chorus, made up of the voices of the
oppressed and forgotten.



Author marieke
shares the story of the book’s conception:



“I should have gone to church.  Instead, curiosity got the better of me before
I even had breakfast, and I started that lazy Sunday by reading my email
messages. The first message I opened had a picture in it, the size of a postage
stamp, and a link I didn’t recognize.  I
usually delete anything that looks like spam immediately, but something about
the picture made me take a closer look.  It
was the tiny image of a man between a woman’s legs. Only something was wrong
with the picture. The woman wasn’t smiling, and she seemed very small compared
to the man. She didn’t have any breasts,
or any shape at all. When the realization hit me that I was looking at a man
and a young girl – a child – I gagged.



“Before I could delete the message from my screen, my two-year old daughter
came running into the room.  In front of
my eyes, two worlds clashed. I quickly deleted the message and held my girl,
sobbing into her hair, telling her, "Sorry, sorry," over and over
again. I was sorry her Mama was so upset
and couldn’t explain.  Sorry she lives in
a world where these terrible things happen.  Sorry for the girl in the picture.  Sorry for all the girls and boys this is
happening to.  Sorry there wasn’t
anything I could do for them.



“It was easy to delete the image from my mailbox, but it turned out to be a lot more
difficult to delete it from my mind. That
Sunday, it dominated my thoughts. It seemed that with every fresh chore I took
on and every new distraction I sought, it jumped to the front again, demanding
my attention. Every time, I felt sick.



“I have never been abused myself. In fact, I had a pleasant
childhood with little to no threats to my safety. The only times that I did feel harassed, were
when I came across stories of child abuse or examples of child pornography.  I think what bothers me most is the feeling
that this abuse is happening and nothing can be done to prevent or stop it. This
feeling of hopelessness is, to me, the worst feeling in the universe.



“That Sunday, it was different.  For ten
years, I had been writing stories – light, fluffy, funny material, like children’s
stories and small-town murder mysteries. Writing is my passion. That Sunday, I
decided to  combine my passion with my
obsession. I decided to write about child abuse. And because I don’t want to
look at any more pictures, I decided to take on the hidden world of child
prostitution, where the abuse of power is enforced by money.



“I placed The Devil’s Virgin in
Thailand because that country is infamous for sex tourism. I was living in
China at the time, a country estimated to have just as many child prostitutes
as Thailand – about 200,000 – but spread over a much larger country and
population, and practically hidden. I chose Thailand because there was plenty
of information on it, and maybe also because it was a bit father from home.



“I focused the story on a girl who is being ‘saved’ to sell
her virginity at a certain age. This is a common practice, especially for
daughters of prostitutes, who, often illegitimate, uneducated, and with no
social status whatsoever, seem destined for the sex trade.



“In hindsight, the decision to write the book was the easy part. Researching
child prostitution was difficult, not because there was not enough material but
rather because of the abundance of information. I found too many cruel statistics, too many stories of children as young
as ten – their bodies so small and fragile – working in the sex trade,
servicing two to twenty men a day.



“Writing this book was the hardest thing I have ever done, made worse by
throwing all the horrible stories of abuse I’d heard through the years, like
the newspaper article about a grandfather in Africa abusing his baby
granddaughter and loaning her out to friends, in a misguided attempt to have
sex while avoiding AIDS.  I started
seeing child abuse everywhere. For a time, I could not enjoy life anymore.



“Fortunately, I found it hard to stay very angry for long, thanks to my toddler
and her natural sense of humor. (Sloshing around water is fun. Throwing rocks
is fun. Writing should on the walls is fun. Even poop is fun.) My girl made me
smile.



“I believe that a book that’s difficult to read should reward its reader with a
happy ending. Is that realistic?
Statistically, perhaps not. But the story of the The Devil’s
Virgin
is fiction, after all.  And
I have this sliver of a belief in my mind, that there always is hope.  I would love to spread that hope to people,
especially children.



“The picture of the poor girl in the e-mail still pops up in my mind in
moments. Even though the actual image is getting fuzzier, the memory still
disgusts me to the point of nausea. But now I can tell her, and myself: Hold
on, my love. I am telling the world about you.”



Featured
WEbook Projects



Know a really great project on
WEbook? Want to spread the word? Send me an email or visit my profile and drop me a
message to nominate it as a Featured
WEbook Project
!



Start Writing Now!



Today’s featured project is open to feedback from all readers! To get started, sign up for WEbook today.



-- Melissa





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