WEbooker of the WEek Keeps it Scary

WoW_button_1 A beautiful librarian isn't what she seems...or is she? The lead singer of a popular rock band performs a chilling encore. A little boy and his sister have a terrifying encounter at a Midwestern pond.

All this and more happens in The Dark and Mysterious, a collection of horrifying short stories by this WEek's WEbooker, MatthewDavid. MatthewDavid's other projects include Violent Faith, a novel about a little boy living with his religious aunt and uncle, and Edwin's Journal, the chronicle of a man who disappears after taking justice into his own hands. But that's not all! MatthewDavid also leads The Glass Onion, a collection of poetry and other snippets for all to contribute to, and his work can be found in dozens of WEbook projects across the site. If you want to be scared, titillated, and entertained, check out his work right away. To find out more about this prolific WEbooker, read on.

Matthewdavid Q: What's the brief story of your life?

A: I was born in Illinois in a suburb outside Chicago. I lived there
until I was twenty years old. Then I moved to the middle of nowhere,
Minnesota. I moved to save some money, but that never quite
happened and I ended up having kids, buying a house, and getting
married. It all worked out pretty well, because there
isn't much to do and I was able to settle down and concentrate on
writing. I always wanted to write, but never had the confidence. Then I
just said, "The hell with it, if anything I'll just do it for myself." To
my amazement, I found that most people enjoyed it and this website has
gave me all the confidence I need. Nothing's going to stop me now!

Q: What's the scariest thing that ever happened to you?

A: When I was about thirteen, I was
over at a friend's house. He lived on a farm and I was sitting around
his living room with another friend of ours. We heard a loud
thumping noise coming from upstairs. It really spooked us because we
were there by ourselves and our parents were in town at the bar. That
thumping came again and we convinced ourselves to go upstairs and find
out what it was. When we got to the top, the loud thump came again and
we booked it down the stairs. For some reason my buddy Paul pulled out a tiny
pocket knife. He was staring out a window when my other friend decided
it would be funny to shake his shoulders and scare him. Well, the joke
was on him, because when he did it, Paul whipped around and accidentally
slit our friend's arm clear to the bone. We had to call an ambulance,
and we never did figure out what that thumping noise was all about.

Q: How do you create your characters? Do you base them on people you know? Who is your favorite character?

A: I
have no set way of creating a character, but I have used people I
know (and sometimes myself) to bring a character to life. Most of the time
I let the story itself form the character. If I was to pick a character
of my own That I liked the most it would have to be Walter McGee From
my book Violent Faith, which is currently in the revision process. He
was very evil and intimidating, which made it a lot of fun to write.

Q: Please write a poem about your favorite day of the WEek.

A: I love Friday afternoons
when the sun is shining and there's no work to do
except for write this poem to you.

Q: If you had an alter-ego, what would you spend your "alter" time doing?

A: If I had an alter-ego, I think I would like to be a modern day Robin Hood.
I would spend my time finding people who think their possessions are everything, and I would take their money and give
their stuff to a family who is struggling to eat.

Q: How often do you get your hair cut?

A: I
haven't actually gotten a professional haircut in years. I usually let
it grow until one day I decide I'm just going to shave my head, then I
break out the buzzers and do it myself.

WEbooker
of the WEek




Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, and feedbacking.



-- Melissa



WEbooker of the WEek Yuks it up Down Under

WoW_button_1 The WEbook Vote marches on, and this WEek's WEbooker is one of the top contenders to become the next published WEbook author. With less than 24 hours before voting closes, In Case of Emergency Please Notify: Orlando Bloom is slugging it out with hundreds of other books -- and it's more than holding its own. The book is funny, engaging, and original -- but what about the author, WEbooker of the WEek Wooster?

When it comes to writing, Wooster has serious street cred. She's
an Australian freelance journalist who writes magazine
features on any and all genres that you can think
of. Wooster does her fair share of serious journalism, but she's
drawn towards lighter, quirkier subjects. She has covered the pet
funeral industry and female bodybuilding competitions, and she's written an expose on the
Mod subculture, scooters and all. What kind of writer is she, in a nutshell? Says Wooster, "I'd rather be Tom Wolfe or
Hunter S. Thompson than Woodward or Bernstein."

Wooster makes journalism sound so fun, I decided to dabble in a little investigative reporting myself, and asked the newest WoW some very tough questions about writing, life, and everything in between.

Wooster Q: Your book
In Case of Emergency Please Notify: Orlando Bloom is up for the WEbook Vote. The narrator is a sassy teenage girl -- "Bridget Jones'
younger sister" -- who writes in an endearing off-the-cuff style,
including lots of contemporary shorthand and slang. What did you enjoy
the most about bringing this character to life? What was most
challenging?

A: What's not to love? She is the real us (well, okay, the real me): self-obsessed, bitchy, deluded. I've learned to hide these aspects of myself, as do
most people, but when you are a teen it's all out there in glorious,
technicolor show. Actually, the character is based on my younger sister
who could bitch for Australia. She puts me to shame.

It was terrific to
bring her to life because she is a great comedy vehicle. She is a bit
of an archetype that people can recognize. Because she is writing
in her diary, she is allowed to be even more honest. I'm sadly not a
teen anymore -- in body anyway -- so the challenging part was to get the
teen-speak right. I had to read my fair share of teen mags and also
consulted with people of a certain age. My main purpose in writing
this was to give readers of all ages consistent laughs. I'm a lover of
great comedy writing and I want to have a giggle when I read. I don't
do soul-searching or angst...just funny.

Q: Which character in your book do you most strongly identify with?

A: The
girl, of course! Everyone thinks of themselves as the main character,
don't they? My teen years, although behind me some considerable way,
are still fresh. I still remember the powerful 'best friend'
friendships that are the center of your life. They turn pear-shaped at
the drop of a hat, and then suddenly all is forgiven. Meanwhile, you
treat your family as if they are the complete dregs. The pop star/actor
obsession is of course mandatory for a teen, and more than a little time
consuming, but what else are you gonna do -- homework?

Q: Do you have any writing quirks? (Food you like to eat while writing; strange fidgets or compulsive behaviors; etc.)

I like a bit of peace and quiet.

I like to be close to horizontal. 

I like a continuous supply of treat and snacks.

I like to have the sun filtering gently but warmly through the blinds.

I like the room to be completely neat.

Is
it any wonder my output is torturously slow? I spend a great deal of
time fluffing the pillows, lining up the snacks, and making sure the
weather is conducive.

Q:What's your favorite word? Use it in a sentence!

Publish, as in, "We want to publish your book."

Vote for In Case of Emergency Please Notify: Orlando Bloom and other WEbooks

Visit the vote page by midnight EST April 20!

WEbooker
of the WEek




Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, and feedbacking.



-- Melissa



WEbooker of the WEek Laughs at Herself

WoW_button_1 The WEbook Vote is underway, and we're on the lookout for projects that make us laugh, cry, or grow longer, stronger, thicker hair in just sixty days. This WEek's WEbooker, Shari, has two projects up for the vote, and while they won't improve your coiffure, they'll certainly make you laugh, and some might make you cry. Be sure to check out Shari's books, Pet Stories and Funny Little Stories about Life and Whatnot -- but first, let's get to know our newest WEbooker of the WEek.

Q: What's the brief story of your life, including your history with writing?

Shari A: I
grew up an only child.   My father was a journalist and, for a
brief time, an English teacher.  He pulled me out of public school for
two years between the ages of twelve and thirteen and made me write
as my only school work.  I kept a journal and that sparked my love of
writing. My parents and I
moved to a remote yoga center/ashram when I was a teenager.  I learned
a lot about other cultures and also learned to have an ecumenical view
point.  Not long after high school I started arranging flowers and got
a job at a local florist.  That turned into a twenty-year career, culminating in the creation of my own shop.  I
owned three different shops over a twelve-year period, and sold flowers,
antiques, my own handmade jewelry, and my husband’s hand-thrown
pottery.  My husband is from South Africa and I had the amazing
opportunity to live there several years ago.  After being diagnosed
with a rare auto-immune disease, I closed my shop and for the past two
years have been concentrating on getting well and writing.  Both are
coming along better than I expected. 

Q: How long have you
been working on
Pet Stories and Funny Little Stories about Life and Whatnot? How did these
projects first get started?  Both projects are group projects, with
contributions from other WEbookers. How are the books different than
they would be if you'd written them by yourself?

A: I started  Pet Stories on MySpace.  It started as a weekly blog about my dog Bodie. 
My friends seemed to like to hear about his antics so I would write
something new each week and then one day I stumbled upon WEbook and
made it an official project. Funny Little Stories about Life and Whatnot started as a
collection sitting on my computer, and once I found WEbook, I turned it
into a project.  I actually think it has helped having others
contribute to the project.  It inspires me to write about things I
might not otherwise think of.  I enjoy teamwork and think that
it's good to get a fresh perspective from fellow writers.

Q: You clearly enjoy humor. Who is the funniest person you know?

A: My dad.  He has a very dry sense of humor and even though he can be sarcastic, he is always entertaining.

Q: A lot of the stories in Funny Little Stories about Life and Whatnot are self-deprecating. Why do
you think it's so entertaining to read people poking fun at their flaws
and struggles?

A: Well, in my case it's what I enjoy reading.  I
love to see that people are human.  As far as my writing is concerned,
it opens my life up to the reader and says, "Take a look".  It's a very
honest approach.  I struggle with fiction because I feel compelled to
tell my own story.  I also think that you have to be able to laugh at
life.  I don't think people want to read something that’s all about
self-pity.  I say if it has to be tragic, let it also be funny.

Q: From your writing, I'd guess that David Sedaris is a source of
inspiration. You write about meeting him in
Funny Little Stories about Life and Whatnot. At the
time, you couldn't think of anything good to say to him when he signed
your book. What would you say to him today if you had a do-over?

A: That’s
a funny question. I'm still scared to death of him. His stories are so brutally honest and
hilarious at the same time. I would ask him what gave him the courage
to get his work out there for the world to see. I would also want to
know about his family because he writes about them in a way that makes
you feel you know them.

Q: What's your favorite recipe?

A: I
make a pretty mean curry. I got the recipe from an Indian woman in
South Africa when we were living there.  t's simple but delicious. You take some olive oil and fry about a teaspoon of medium curry
powder, 1 teaspoon of coriander powder, 1 onion, 1 clove of garlic, and
1 teaspoon of salt. Add 4 cubed potatoes and sauté until brown but
not burning.  Add 1 large cubed tomato -- and then you can get creative. 
I like to add 1 carrot, 1/2 head of cauliflower, 1 zucchini chopped and
a handful of string beans chopped.  The trick is to cook it without
adding water.  You have to stir it often so it won't burn.  Right at
the end I add a cup of baby spinach and stir.  I serve it with basmati
rice and a dollop of sour cream and mango pickle.

Q: What's your favorite project up for the WEbook vote -- other than your own, of course?

A: RikScott's novel Five.

WEbooker
of the WEek




Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, and feedbacking.



-- Melissa



WEbooker of the WEek Eats a Healthy Breakfast

WoW_button_1
Ordinarily, when I write about a WEbooker of the WEek, I like to focus on his or her writing, feedbacking, or project leadership chops. After all, that's what being a WEbooker is all about. Make no mistake, this week's WEbooker, omanh, is no slouch when it comes to these crucial WEbook skills. He's also got something important to say in his Vietnam memoir, Headquarters 33. (The book is a contender for publication in the WEbook vote, starting April 6.)

But let's face it, folks -- at WEbook, fantastic writers with fascinating stories are a dime a dozen. What really sets omanh apart is what he eats for breakfast. Dying to know his secret recipe? Before we get to that, let's learn a little more about our new WEbooker of the WEek.

Omanh
Q: What's the brief story of your life, including your history with writing?

I grew up in Minneapolis during the 1950s and ‘60s. I am the
third of six children. My family life was traditional and Roman Catholic. In school, teachers often encouraged me to write after they read my essays. I also took speech in my junior year of high school and was
surprised by my own achievements.  It seemed that even kids who didn’t
like me laughed at my speeches!  I began to discover the "person of
letters" side of myself. I
could have been in a play in high school, but I didn’t check to see if my audition had bumped me into a
slot.  So, I lost my chance.   Maybe I could have been an actor.  
Well, some folks might say I really have become an actor.

Q: Your
book, Headquarters 33, is up for the WEbook vote. If it is chosen for
publication, what impact do you hope it will have? What do you think
your story has to teach people today, so long after the end of the
Vietnam War?

Vietnam was an incredibly unique and hard
experience for all Americans.  We lost a war.  That was not an easy
thing for people in the U.S. to grasp.  In fact, many of us have
continued to the present day to attempt to undo the past.

In Headquarters 33, I write my story with as much authenticity and honesty
as possible. I relate my
experiences from the beginning of my time in Vietnam, exploring how combat and the
concept of personal survival were built into the
U.S. military's approach. The result affected
the morale of the U.S. troops, but it had an even more significant impact on the military's morals.  The very
youthful airmen, sailors, and soldiers suffered the loss of both morale and morals -- and therein lay the failure of the U.S. military to achieve an honorable outcome.

I hope that anyone
who reads Headquarters 33 will come away from the experience with a
greater desire for the world to seek peace. War is a folly we
can no longer afford. The planet is getting
smaller and will not endure the destruction of war much longer.  If we
as humankind decide to fight the wars against poverty, famine, disease,
and the loss of the integrity of our environment, we may be able to
save our species and give our children and grandchildren a future!

Q: What is the hardest thing about writing?

Condensing what I want to say into fewer words. It's a challenge to achieve brevity without losing the full meaning of what I want to say.

Q: What is your writing routine like?

I write as I am inspired.  One of the things I like about WEbook Project
Invites is that if someone has a good idea, it may well inspire me to
write something on the spot!  I don't follow a regular routine in my
writing habits.

Q: Have you had a chance to look at any other projects up for the WEbook vote? Any favorites? (Other than your own, of course!)

I enjoy The Life and Times of McZero and Pieces of Pi.

Q: What's your favorite thing to eat for breakfast?

Something called a “Healthy Start”.  The name comes from an entree
created by a local deli.  It is yogurt, peanut butter,
granola, bananas, and honey served in a grilled tortilla.   The heat
from the grilled tortilla does wonderful things to the mix of
ingredients.

WEbooker
of the WEek




Do you
have a line on the wonderfullest writer on WEbook?
The fantastickest feedbacker? Or anyone else who goes above and beyond to make WEbook the best writing, reading, and
publishing community on the internet? Drop me an email, or visit my profile and send me a
message with the title "WEbooker
of the WEek
" to nominate your favorite WEbooker and he or she will
have a shot at joining the ranks of the immortals -- and getting a free WEbook T-shirt to boot.



Join WEbook Today



Sign up for WEbook today and
start reading, writing, and feedbacking.



-- Melissa



Popular Posts

The WEbook Store